Books

The Pulitzer Prize awards were announced on April 15 by the Columbia School of Journalism. Winning for biography was The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke by Jeffrey C. Stewart. Stewart is chair of the Black Studies Department at the University of California at Santa Barbara and author of several major works.

The Pulitzer committee cited Stewart for creating "a panoramic view of the personal trials and artistic triumphs of the father of the Harlem Renaissance and the movement he inspired."

Stewart’s biography previously won the National Book Award for NonFiction. His massive work — 1,000 pages — published by Oxford University Press, details the life of black, gay intellectual, Alain Leroy Locke.

Jazz legend and international disco sensation Andy Kahn splits his time between Philadelphia and Atlantic City, but still found time to pen a musical memoir.

In “The Hot Shot Heard ’Round the World” — named for his legendary 1978 dance hit “Hot Shot” — the proudly out Kahn presents a warts-and-all showcase of the music business, the gay disco scene, Philadelphia and beyond.

The author is scheduled to speak, play and sign his truth at Shakespeare & Co. on April 18.

Thomas Mallon is not only an icon of the journalistic arts-and-trade and a one-time titan of Republican thought (“I staggered out of bed on the morning of Nov. 9, 2016, went online to the D.C. Board of Elections site, left the Republican Party and changed my registration to Independent”). He also is a famously out gentleman who in his  newest book, “Landfall,” gnashes into the George W. Bush presidency and the woes of 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina with brio and smarts.

Nishta J. Mehra is a first-generation American, the daughter of Indian immigrants who was born and raised in Memphis, Tenn. She now lives in Phoenix, Ariz., with her wife, who is white, and her adopted child, who is black.

In her new book of essays, “Brown White Black,” she paints a vivid picture of their experiences dealing with America’s rigid ideas of race, gender and sexuality, as well as her family’s daily struggle to make space for itself amid increasing social and idealistic divisions in society.

“The Best Bad Things”

Katrina Carrasco

Crime fiction

If there is a book with more gender fluidity than this, I haven’t seen it. Protagonist Alma Rosales can change into any shape she likes. For a large part of this story, she presents herself as Jack Camp, a rough dockworker looking for work. In reality, she’s a former Pinkerton’s investigator.

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