Features

 

For more than 30 years, Gengoroh Tagame, the celebrated gay Japanese manga artist, created bara-themed erotica: manga made for gay men by a gay man, stylized by bear-ish characters engaged in BDSM. 

In 2014, his work took a sharp turn to focus on family life.

Comedian, actress and dish queen Kathy Griffin is no stranger to controversy, but this year she finds herself back from celebrity exile after drawing the fiery and somewhat hypocritical wrath of the political establishment, media and the entertainment industry last year for a satirical photo she took depicting her holding the severed, bloody head of Presdient Donald Trump. The result was quick and decisive, as representatives for venues and networks across the country rushed to cut ties and cancel upcoming gigs.

There’s a lot of misfit action rampant at Plays & Players in October. The theater’s long-running tenant, 1812 Productions, just happens to be this city’s sole company purely dedicated to all things comic. British playwright Tom Wells writes about his gray industrial hometown of Hull, England with misfit-driven plays about escapism such as “Folk,” “Jumpers for Goalposts” and now “Broken Biscuits,” which has its American premiere at 1812 in October.

 When soprano Patricia Racette — opera sensation, gay woman, activist, enthusiast — approaches “Ne Quittez Pas: A Reimagined La Voix Humaine” for O18, she does it with the same relish she had with the most famous roles in her career, including Violetta in “La Traviata,” Mimì and Musetta in “La Bohème” and Cio-Cio San in “Madama Butterfly.”

In choreographer Trajal Harrell, modern dance has its most poignant historian, funniest class clown and most sensual essayer of cultures and expressions outside his own era.

Along with creating the post-vogue classic series “Twenty Looks or Paris is Burning at the Judson Church” for the 2014 Fringe Festival, Harrell — who spends most of his time in France — is also famous for the messed-up version of the hoochie-coochie, as presented in his new Fringe work, “Caen Amour.”

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