Television

 It’s been a tough week for the millions of fans of Michael Jackson, an iconic figure in American music, often referred to as “The King of Pop.” A month after the six-hour Lifetime documentary “Surviving R Kelly” resulted in R&B singer R Kelly being arrest on sexual assault charges and held on $1 million bail, HBO has aired a 236-minute documentary, “Leaving Neverland.”

 It has been a decade — International Women’s Day 2009, to be exact — since the final episode of “The L Word” aired on Showtime. Throughout six seasons, the groundbreaking series was the first to ever center lesbian and bisexual women.

And after 10 long, lesbian-less years, “The L Word” is coming back. 

 

Bisexuality has been a trope on TV for decades, and not a good one. For years both lesbians and bisexual women have watched with dismay as bisexuality or lesbianism in a TV character was erased.

Despite the increasing visibility of LGBT athletes in recent years, a new documentary shows how and why it’s still an uphill battle for openly gay figures in professional sports.

“Alone in the Game,” which premiered on AT&T’s Audience Network June 28, follows a group of LGBTQ athletes from some of the biggest sports franchises, including the NFL, NBA and NCAA, to explore the struggles and hard choices they face from the professional level all the way down to high-school sports. The subjects share their personal stories of trying to compete as openly gay athletes or living as closeted players in fear of what coming out would do to their careers.

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