Arts & Culture

When it became clear to Philadelphia-based playwright and dramaturg Jacqueline Goldfinger that her newest play, “Click,” was going to be produced, she knew whose sound would make it whole.

“I immediately thought of Pax to create the music and soundscape, as their deep knowledge of both traditional theater music and other forms — including opera, cabaret and chorale — have been enormously important in creating the complex on-and-offline worlds of the play,” Goldfinger said.

Pax is Pax Ressler, the non-binary Philadelphia theater multi-hyphenate whose compositional soundscapes surround and infest “Click” like a virus and move like a tech-savvy monolith.

It’s been a while since we’ve gotten a significant amount of music or art to consume from Amanda Palmer. Now she’s back in action with a new album, “There Will Be No Intermission,” and an international tour and book release.

The bisexual singer-songwriter, author and performance artist made a name for herself as half of the gothic/punk cabaret duo The Dresden Dolls before pursuing a solo career.

FOLK WISDOM: Iconic out folk-rock duo The Indigo Girls return to the area for a trip through their storied catalog of songs, March 28 and 29 at Scottish Rite Auditorium, 315 White Horse Pike, Collingswood, N.J. For more information or tickets, call 856-858-1000.

Good sex is always good sex, but it takes a special person to turn bad sex into something amazing. And that’s where out New York comedian and podcaster Natalie Wall comes in.

Wall is the creator and producer of “Awkward Sex … and the City,” a podcast that showcases comedians and other assorted guests sharing hilarious, revealing and/or cringe-worthy stories of their sexual exploits.

 Philadelphia’s annual LGBTQ film festival is days away — and one of the highlights features a very Philly story.

In the short film “Going Forward,” screening 7 p.m. March 25 (opening night) at the Kimmel’s Perelman Theater, local filmmaker Tim Harris follows Pennsylvania State Rep. Malcolm Kenyatta on Election Day 2018 as he becomes the first openly gay person of color to be elected to state office.

Out gay Canadian writer/director Keith Behrman’s sophomore feature, “Giant Little Ones,” is an ambitious, over-stuffed drama about queer teen sexuality.

The film introduces Franky (Josh Wiggins) and Ballas (Darren Mann), two handsome 16-year-olds who have been best friends forever.

Thomas Mallon is not only an icon of the journalistic arts-and-trade and a one-time titan of Republican thought (“I staggered out of bed on the morning of Nov. 9, 2016, went online to the D.C. Board of Elections site, left the Republican Party and changed my registration to Independent”). He also is a famously out gentleman who in his  newest book, “Landfall,” gnashes into the George W. Bush presidency and the woes of 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina with brio and smarts.

Because I’ve spent a considerable amount of time in Canada, I can tell you there’s a lot of comedic talent in our neighbor to the north.

One of those comedians is Kyle Brownrigg, who is fearless and openly gay with a devastatingly funny and razor-sharp sense of deadpan delivery. And he just released his debut live comedy album “Unmedicated: The New Fragrance.”

In June 1969, a small group of social misfits, outcasts and pariahs had had enough.

The watering hole in which they were socializing among themselves, not hurting anyone, was being raided by the police — yet again. Out of frustration and anger, some of these people fought back. The watering hole was New York’s Stonewall Inn, and the resultant altercation escalated into a three-day riot that sparked the modern gay-rights movement.

And who was in the forefront of the Stonewall Riots, manning the barricades, fighting tear gas with mockery and chorus lines, standing up to police in riot gear?

Drag queens.

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