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In April 2015, a year before the U.S. Departments of Justice and Education under then-President Barack Obama issued guidance to public schools clarifying that Title IX protected transgender students, a school district in Virginia faced a dilemma: A fourth-grade student transitioned.

Recent reports say that 0.7 percent of teens identify as transgender. At the same time, a recent study from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) reports that 50.8 percent of trans-masculine people attempt suicide, with gender-nonconforming people doing the same 41.8 percent of the time, and 29.9 percent of trans-masculine people also attempting to kill themselves.

One of the most important things for a trans person is their identity. We live in a world that is constantly, doggedly, trying to strip that away from us. We face pressure over this throughout our lives — and often end up losing that battle after death.

In 1993, a transgender woman named Lauren Diana Wilson took her life. Her family claimed her body, and later held a funeral. From what I was able to learn about it, she was buried in male clothing, with her hair clipped. Her parents listed her as male and under her birth name — known in trans circles as one’s “deadname.” They kept the event private, so that no one in her life could attend.

There is an irony: I have been an out trans woman for nearly 25 years at this point, having started on this path in 1993 and beginning my public transition in 1995. In all that time, so many around me viewed my transition — and, by extension, transgender people overall — as something new and previously unseen.

When I was a kid, there was precious little out in pop culture about trans issues. Sure, there were movies like “The Christine Jorgensen Story,” where an actor named John Hansen played the title character, or “Dog Day Afternoon,” where Al Pacino’s character staged a robbery to pay for the surgery of his lover, portrayed by male actor Chris Sarandon.

The World Health Organization is dropping transgender identities from its list of mental disorders in its newest edition of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems.

It’s Pride month, and this means a whole lot of people will take or have taken to the streets across the world, festooned in their best rainbow gear. We’ll march, and party, and do all those things we’ll do at Pride. It will be crazy and chaotic, and we will be the big messy community we are, in all our glory.

A fascinating study has come out of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Researchers used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to study the brains of transgender people who have and haven’t been on hormone treatments, and to compare them to the brains of nontransgender-identified men and women.

The other day, after doing a talk at a local middle school’s “Rainbow Connection” group, I picked my wife up from work. Tired after our long days, we headed to the nearest sit-down eatery, a Denny’s. We had a lovely meal, one that in most cases I might recommend.

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