Mombian by Dana Rudolph

Mombian offers a mix of parenting insights, book reviews, media analysis and political and legal commentary for and about LGBTQ parents and our children. It takes an LGBTQ-focused look at parenting topics and explores other aspects of the LGBTQ community with a parent's eye. Dana Rudolph is the the founder and publisher of Mombian, a GLAAD Media Award-winning blog and resource directory for LGBTQ parents. She's the lesbian mom of a middle-schooler and lives with her spouse of over two decades. For more information, visit www.mombian.com.


February, despite being the shortest month, is often a hard one. Where I live, any day might be a snow day, with my son home from school and the sidewalks needing to be shoveled. The usual routine of laundry and groceries and dinner doesn’t stop. In recent weeks, too, I have been distracted by the news stories of a government chipping away at the rights of LGBTQ people, immigrants and others. How not to be overwhelmed by it all? Here are some of the stories about LGBTQ families making February just a bit warmer.

For J. R. Ford, father of a 5-year-old transgender girl, appearing in the upcoming National Geographic documentary “Gender Revolution: A Journey” with Katie Couric was “more than an obligation.” He and his wife Vanessa let Couric into their Washington, D.C., home, hoping that, as Vanessa explained, their family would be “relatable” to those who know little about transgender people — and that other families with transgender children would “know they’re not alone.”

I made a cake Nov. 8 to celebrate what I thought would be Hillary Clinton’s election. For decoration, I melted sugar into sheets and broke it into shards to represent the glass ceiling that I hoped she would shatter. On Nov. 9, however, I found myself looking at the remains of the cake and wondering if it better represented an earlier event on that date: Kristallnacht, when Nazi-led mobs vandalized hundreds of synagogues, Jewish homes, schools, businesses, hospitals and cemeteries, leaving the streets littered in broken glass.

Back-to-school time can be stressful for any parent. There are supplies to buy, schedules to arrange and forms to fill out. For many LGBTQ parents, it can bring up worries about our children’s inclusion and safety — but it can also be an opportunity for building bridges.

I had an encounter with the police a few weeks ago. I am an avid cyclist, and had a flat while on a ride, about 15 miles from home. I was struggling to change my tire when a local officer drove by, stopped to see if I needed help and offered to drive me to my house. I took her up on it, not wanting to spend any more time baking in the hot sun. My bike went into the back seat, I sat in the front and we chatted about the weather during the drive.

I wrote this column just before the shooting in Orlando. To rewrite it before my deadline would be to find words for something I do not yet have words for. I hope that my reflections on Pride nevertheless help give us strength as a community during one of our most difficult times.

May is National Museum Month, and LGBTQ families have a growing source of support in museums — including ones aimed at children — that have been reaching out to welcome all kinds of families. Margaret Middleton, a Boston-based designer, speaker and consultant, has been a leader in this effort.

Find us on Facebook
Follow Us
Find Us on YouTube
Find Us on Instagram
Sign Up for Our Newsletter