Mombian by Dana Rudolph

Mombian offers a mix of parenting insights, book reviews, media analysis and political and legal commentary for and about LGBTQ parents and our children. It takes an LGBTQ-focused look at parenting topics and explores other aspects of the LGBTQ community with a parent's eye. Dana Rudolph is the the founder and publisher of Mombian, a GLAAD Media Award-winning blog and resource directory for LGBTQ parents. She's the lesbian mom of a middle-schooler and lives with her spouse of over two decades. For more information, visit www.mombian.com.


Pride Month is 30 days long, but the energy and inspiration we gain from it can last all year. Here, then, are some of the things I hope we LGBTQ parents can all experience during this season of rainbows to sustain us in times to come.

My spouse Helen and I recently celebrated our 25th anniversary (though our time as legal spouses is obviously shorter). Reaching a quarter-century together — just about half of my life — feels significant in a way that previous anniversaries, even milestone ones at the decade marks, have not. Here are a few reflections on the occasion.

Two new books, one for middle grades and one for young adults, show two different ways of incorporating LGBT characters and themes into a story.

In Erica Perl’s middle-grade novel “All Three Stooges” (Alfred A. Knopf), seventh-graders Noah and his friend Dash share a love of comedy and a somewhat reluctant commitment to their bar-mitzvah preparations. Noah has a sister and two moms, and the latter are introduced without fanfare — this isn’t necessarily a book about having two moms.

 

Halloween is almost here — which, for many of us, means trips to the store to purchase overpriced costumes or hours spent sewing and hot-glueing homemade versions, both for our kids and for ourselves.

As a child, there were two things I thought were unfathomable and absolutely morally wrong: nuclear war and Nazis. To see both in the news again as real threats to our country sickens and appalls me. But while nuclear war felt like a broad threat against all humanity, Nazism felt more personal. It was hate largely directed against a group — Jews — of which I was part. (It was only later in life that I added “queer” to that list as well.)

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