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Bulking, a popular activity in the fitness industry, has become a household concept for those wanting to lean out and build muscle. 

The Philadelphia Falcons Soccer League (falcons-soccer.org) made the decision earlier this year to move its annual Liberty Bell Classic from Memorial Day weekend to the weekend of OutFest. The tournament has had several morphs in date, location and size. With a little help from Falcon member Jessie Drummer, I reconnected with Craig Carty, who was there at the very beginning.

After watching the last episode of “American Horror Story,” a moment during the episode stuck with me for the rest of the night. No, it wasn’t the clowns, but the scene that mentioned PrEP. It was a monumental occasion because this meant that PrEP has finally hit the mainstream media. While this is great for PrEP gaining exposure to a larger audience, the real work of getting the information and services to those who need it is nowhere close to being finished. And this is a journey that many should consider taking.

With the great advancements in how HIV is managed and the success of antiretroviral therapies, people living with HIV are aging successfully into their elder years. Additionally, mid- and later-life adults are continuing to become newly infected with HIV. According to the latest CDC surveillance data, 48.8 percent of people living with HIV in the Philadelphia metropolitan area are age 50 or over. An additional 24.6 percent are between the ages of 40-49. 

In recent years, when the terms “LGBTQ” and “small business” are discussed in the media, it’s usually in response to a small but vocal minority demanding religious freedom to refuse service to members of the LGBTQ community, and the legal battles that follow. However, perhaps there are more important discussions revolving around business and the LGBTQ community — the power LGBTQ-owned businesses have in furthering equality.

You wake up in the morning and read the paper or browse your Facebook feed, eat breakfast, head to work and come home to sometimes do more work. Or maybe you come home in time to eat dinner and you only have enough time to watch your favorite show followed by getting ready for bed. It is fair to say that we are all busy and it can be difficult to balance our lives enough to include our loved ones, work and play — let alone trying to maintain good health overall.

These three words are the theme of the 16th Annual Philadelphia Trans Health Conference. These words honor the transgender community, which continues overcoming obstacles and moving forward. Some of those obstacles are of a personal nature and may involve self, relationships, families or health. For others, they may be related to age, ability, ethnicity or race. Gender identity and gender expression, along with our diverse individual characteristics, can and often do, call on our reserves of strength and power to preserve as we move forward.

As a child, there were two things I thought were unfathomable and absolutely morally wrong: nuclear war and Nazis. To see both in the news again as real threats to our country sickens and appalls me. But while nuclear war felt like a broad threat against all humanity, Nazism felt more personal. It was hate largely directed against a group — Jews — of which I was part. (It was only later in life that I added “queer” to that list as well.)

The need to belong is primal in human beings. Not belonging, or being in a state of loneliness, is detrimental to our overall well-being. As many people age, they lose partners and friends, which makes them susceptible to being alone. For many LGBT elders who lose a partner or friends, the situation can be even more dire. Without the familial unit that many heterosexual couples share, LGBT elders are often on their own in many situations, with no one to turn to.

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