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Jackson is now 7 months old and has hit many of the milestones we were so looking forward to. He (mostly) consistently sleeps through the night, has two teeth and can successfully eat a laundry list of fruits and vegetables, sometimes even holding the spoon himself.

While we’ve gleefully jotted down all these firsts with their dates in his baby book, his sleeping, teething and eating accomplishments were nowhere near one-day events. Instead, each win he’s had was after a series of fits and starts (sometimes actual fits!) and trial and error. Yet, with each checkbox we’ve hit, those frustrations quickly became a muted memory as our pride in his accomplishments swelled.

Since the early 1980s, the messaging within our communities in relation to HIV has been focused on surviving. In the earlier days of the AIDS crisis, avoiding and/or surviving the plague needed to be the focus.

For many, it worked. People took control of their health. Armed with the standard of care put out by ACT-UP Philadelphia, LGBT Philadelphians went to their appointments with their doctors equipped with the best information available at that time to hopefully survive.

Centuries ago, during the witch trials of the medieval era, a unique way of determining who was or wasn’t a witch was created. A woman suspected of being a witch would have her right thumb bound to the big toe on her left foot. She would then have a rope tied around her waist, and be thrown into a nearby pond or river.

She was viewed as a witch if she floated, as her body had “rejected baptism” in the water. She would then be put to death for her supposed crimes. If she sunk in the water — drowning in the process — she was deemed pure.

Either way, the woman ended up dead.

Recently I got into a Facebook argument, which we all know is totally productive and include rational and well-thought out discourses (kidding). But the argument was about something I’ve previously written about. Here’s how it went: 

A gay man posted a meme that depicted two pictures.

The early months of the year, when people still haven’t quite given up their resolutions, can be challenging at the gym. Similarly, trying to go directly after work when everyone else is going can also be tricky. There are people everywhere and most of the equipment you may wish to use is occupied.

People and families come in many forms, as any LGBTQ person can attest. Now, Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual) is using that concept to improve upon its already LGBTQ-inclusive employee benefits. The FORTUNE 100 company, which has approximately 7,500 employees around the country (and more than 130,000 life insurance policy-owners in Pennsylvania), is rolling out new benefits around leave, gender affirmation, family creation and more that empower all employees and demonstrate a deep understanding of LGBTQ people’s lives.

    When Ashlee and I moved out of our first apartment into our first house three years ago, we were overjoyed that we finally had a kitchen we could cook in, let alone turn around in. Our first night in the house, our moving crew of friends deemed the kitchen the perpetual hangout spot in our house, christening it with a rousing beer-pong game. From date nights to holiday dinners to raucous parties, our kitchen has seen it all.

When the U.S. Supreme Court passed marriage equality in 2015, LGBTQ citizens and their allies rejoiced. But it did not mean full equality in the eyes of the law. There are still questions surrounding LGBTQ civil rights, particularly around children. These questions most often arise when LGBTQ couples with children dissolve their relationship or marriage and the court must make custody determinations.

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