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For the last couple of years, I spent a lot of time warning of the dangers to come. Now, I no longer have to. Because, you see, the danger is here.

The Supreme Court of the United States took an unusual action recently, in a 5-4 decision to let the Trump Administration ban transgender members from the military, even as lower courts are still hearing arguments. This could well mean thousands of transgender people may be discharged.

Perhaps George Bernard Shaw was right when he said, “I can remember quite well the joy I felt when my family was happy.” But, what is a family, and why does the concept seem so out of grasp for me, and many others?

It is often thought older adults have little knowledge of, or interest, in technology and the internet. In a generation that did not grow up with smartphones or computers, many elders express some hesitation about relying on technology. Yet, as the baby-boom generation ages, an increasing number of older adults are actively utilizing technology to reduce isolation, manage health conditions and connect with vital information.

A new year may motivate many of us to ponder new endeavors. For some, this may mean taking the first steps toward parenthood — so I wanted to revisit some of the tips I found most useful as my spouse and I began our own journey. This is not a guide on how to create a family (there are too many options to explore in a column of this length), but rather some suggestions on what you may want to do first in order to start weighing those options.

We’re three weeks into a new year, which means many are struggling to fulfill their pledges of eating healthier, working out and being more philanthropic. I’ve never been one for making a New Year’s resolution but, as I head further on this journey of raising a child, having some parameters in ink seems like the perfect way to get my parenting priorities in order.

Have you ever noticed that every season is filled with guilt?

“Get your summer body!”

“Stay away from your favorite foods this holiday season.”

“Get back on track.”

“Bulk up this winter for a six-pack this summer.”

There is a culture of guilt in the fitness industry that makes the idea of staying healthy distasteful. Better health and fitness tend to revolve around getting a six-pack or losing weight instead of improving one’s well-being, confidence and performance.

It amazes me how so many seem to view the notion of “transgender people” as if it were something that magically winked into existence just five years ago. It’s as if the moment they first heard of transgender people is the moment transgender people came into existence, rather than it merely being the moment they stopped living in ignorance about the existence of transgender identity.

Q: It seems that the holidays sneak up on me every year and I find myself struggling to afford gifts and visits with family and friends. So I charge these expenses and then end up making payments well into the next year. There’s got to be a better way!

A: It does often seem like we blink and another year has already gone by. The key to managing holiday spending is to treat it as you would any other financial goal: Plan, budget and save. Financially happy holidays are a year-long endeavor.

My family of origin always has our biggest gathering on Thanksgiving. My spouse Helen, our son and I pretty much party from then until Helen’s birthday in early January, marking Hanukkah, Christmas and New Year’s Day along the way. It’s both exhilarating and exhausting.

So, once again, we reach the closing of the year.

When I was much younger than I am today, as the scent of the Douglas fir my father set up in the front room would waft through the house and the glow of holiday lights would produce a diffused glow of color against the window blinds on my bedroom, I would find myself making my holiday wish list.

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