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While acceptance of LGBTQ individuals has been growing rapidly in the last decade, there are still subsets of people who abhor any orientation other than heterosexual. Coming out is never an easy process for LGBTQ people, no matter their age. For teens experiencing same-sex attraction, particularly those whose families are deeply religious, there are added fears: “What if they kick me out?” “What if they disown me completely?” “What if they make me ‘pray the gay away?’”

It feels like every day someone is attempting to legislate transgender people. While “bathroom bills” feel like they’re finally on the wane, laws around transgender medical needs, the right to serve in the military and so many more horrible bills are making their appearance. Oh, and of course, the other big fad: whether transgender people can participate in sports.

Every time these rules come up, however, we’re left with one fundamental question: How does one define gender or sex?

Buckle up. This one is gonna get messy.

Have you ever found yourself wondering whether it would be more effective doing resistance training or high-intensity interval training (HIIT)? Have you ever wondered if you should train with high repetitions or low repetitions? Should you lift heavy weights or light weights? Maybe you have wondered if you should superset your exercises. Deciding on the right mode of exercise can be challenging and complex because none of these options are actually wrong. It's your goals and interests that will ultimately determine the right mode of exercise for you.

March is coming in like the proverbial lion with a wave of good news for LGBTQ families.

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy (D) signed a bill Feb. 19, expanding the state’s paid family-leave law in a number of ways, including by expanding the definition of “family” to include chosen families and expanding the definition of “parent” to include foster parents and those who become parents via gestational surrogacy.

“New Jersey is now the first state in the nation to offer paid family leave that is inclusive of all families,” according to the Center for American Progress, which also observed in a statement, “Making paid leave available to chosen family is especially important to LGBTQ people and people with disabilities, as they are disproportionately likely to need time off to care for chosen family.”

Jackson is now 7 months old and has hit many of the milestones we were so looking forward to. He (mostly) consistently sleeps through the night, has two teeth and can successfully eat a laundry list of fruits and vegetables, sometimes even holding the spoon himself.

While we’ve gleefully jotted down all these firsts with their dates in his baby book, his sleeping, teething and eating accomplishments were nowhere near one-day events. Instead, each win he’s had was after a series of fits and starts (sometimes actual fits!) and trial and error. Yet, with each checkbox we’ve hit, those frustrations quickly became a muted memory as our pride in his accomplishments swelled.

Since the early 1980s, the messaging within our communities in relation to HIV has been focused on surviving. In the earlier days of the AIDS crisis, avoiding and/or surviving the plague needed to be the focus.

For many, it worked. People took control of their health. Armed with the standard of care put out by ACT-UP Philadelphia, LGBT Philadelphians went to their appointments with their doctors equipped with the best information available at that time to hopefully survive.

Q: My spouse and I are in our early 60s, without children, and are concerned about the risk of needing care in the future. Do you think most couples who can afford it should consider buying long-term care insurance?

Centuries ago, during the witch trials of the medieval era, a unique way of determining who was or wasn’t a witch was created. A woman suspected of being a witch would have her right thumb bound to the big toe on her left foot. She would then have a rope tied around her waist, and be thrown into a nearby pond or river.

She was viewed as a witch if she floated, as her body had “rejected baptism” in the water. She would then be put to death for her supposed crimes. If she sunk in the water — drowning in the process — she was deemed pure.

Either way, the woman ended up dead.

Recently I got into a Facebook argument, which we all know is totally productive and include rational and well-thought out discourses (kidding). But the argument was about something I’ve previously written about. Here’s how it went: 

A gay man posted a meme that depicted two pictures.

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