Obituaries

 

“Our beautiful friend Tony Lombardo is now with the angels,” so wrote local gay philanthropist Mel Heifetz on Facebook, about the passing of his longtime friend and companion.

 

Dawn Munro, scientist, champion for LGBT elders and longtime trans activist has died after a brief illness. To all who knew her, she was a forthright, uncompromising and remarkable person. Her concern for trans people and trans issues was unwavering, and she was honored by Philly Pride Presents and Outfest for her commitment and activism.

Munro was on the boards of PFLAG, the Philadelphia LGBT Elder Initiative, the Philadelphia Police LGBT Liaison Committee and Sisterly LOVE. Munro was also an organizer of the Trans Day of Remembrance for the William Way Center.

Ted Faigle, artist and LGBT and AIDS activist, died suddenly on Aug. 21 at his home in Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania. He was 66. Faigle had retired from his position as an LGBT grants analyst at Drexel University in 2013.

A long-time fixture in the Philadelphia LGBTQ activist community, Faigle had been involved in the Gay Community Center and had worked at Giovanni’s Room Bookstore for years. He was also a co-host of the gay radio program, “Gay Dreams” on WXPN-FM.

 

Henry Weitz, a long-time member of the Philadelphia LGBTQ community, died July 12 after a long illness. Born in Brooklyn, Weitz lived in Philadelphia most of his adult life.

“He will be forever known as a kind and gentle soul,” his memorial page reads.

Some people are so huge in life they deserve all the adjectives in death. Legendary lesbian filmmaker Barbara Hammer was one of those people.

Hammer died on March 16 in New York City after a long battle with ovarian cancer. She had been in hospice care. 

 

By all accounts, Barbra Casbar Siperstein was funny, smart and unafraid.

She was a champion of transgender rights and a towering figure in local trans history. Everyone called her “Babs.”

Siperstein died Feb. 3 of cancer at RWJBarnabas Health in New Brunswick, N.J., announced Garden State Equality. She was 76.

On an early Sunday evening, with the sun still shining brightly outside her door, a small crowd gathers around mixologist Ashley Coleman’s bar at Tavern at Camac.

As people wander into the Tavern’s dark glow, the bar’s sleekly shined piano and stool — one of TOC’s most famous elements — sit empty.

Find us on Facebook
Follow Us
Find Us on YouTube
Find Us on Instagram
Sign Up for Our Newsletter