Local biz group gets top national honor
Jul 31, 2014 | 193 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Independence Business Alliance has been named the top LGBT chamber of commerce in the nation. In an announcement made Thursday at its Business & Leadership Conference in Las Vegas, the National Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce named IBA the 2014 Chamber of the Year. IBA serves 11 counties in the greater Philadelphia region. NGLCC represents 52 affiliated chambers throughout the nation. “The IBA is excited to share this honor with the local LGBT and allied business community we serve," said IBA executive administrator Tom Cavanaugh. "We aim to promote growth and economic development in our region. It is an honor to be recognized for our hard work, and we hope to inspire Philadelphia for years to come.” To garner the top award, a chamber must illustrate sustained growth, relevance to the LGBT community and engagement in local and national policywork, the LGBT business-certification effort and overall business equality. NGLCC co-founder and president Justin Nelson said IBA is "developing innovative ways to engage with their community." Nelson noted that board president Rich Horrow, along with IBA board and staff, "truly embody the spirit of national/local partnership. Their work partnering with major corporations, their extensive educational and outreach programming and their engagement with the local business community is consistent and impressive.”
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Out & About: Aug. 1-7
Jul 31, 2014 | 62 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>ATLANTIC (ROCK) CITY:<b/> Rock titans Kiss and Def Leppard have teamed up for a tour that is hitting the area twice this weekend: 7 p.m. Aug. 2 at Boardwalk Hall, 2301 Boardwalk, Atlantic City, N.J., and 7 p.m. Aug. 3 at Susquehanna Bank Center, 1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, N.J. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.defleppard.com/tours/summer-tour-w-kiss-2014">www.defleppard.com/tours/summer-tour-w-kiss-2014</a>.
ATLANTIC (ROCK) CITY: Rock titans Kiss and Def Leppard have teamed up for a tour that is hitting the area twice this weekend: 7 p.m. Aug. 2 at Boardwalk Hall, 2301 Boardwalk, Atlantic City, N.J., and 7 p.m. Aug. 3 at Susquehanna Bank Center, 1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, N.J. For more information, visit www.defleppard.com/tours/summer-tour-w-kiss-2014.
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<b>CHOICE CUTS:</b> Catch the wildly fun gender-bending rock musical “Hedwig & The Angry Inch” when it is screened 8 p.m. Aug. 4 at the Trocadero Theatre, 1003 Arch St. For more information call 215-922-6888.
CHOICE CUTS: Catch the wildly fun gender-bending rock musical “Hedwig & The Angry Inch” when it is screened 8 p.m. Aug. 4 at the Trocadero Theatre, 1003 Arch St. For more information call 215-922-6888.
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<b>CHILDREN’S TELEVISION TWERK-SHOP:</b> Former Disney Channel star and pop singer Miley Cyrus will have tongues wagging when she brings her Bangerz Tour to town 7:30 p.m. Aug. 2 at Wells Fargo Center, 3601 S. Broad St. For more information or tickets, call 215-389-9543.
CHILDREN’S TELEVISION TWERK-SHOP: Former Disney Channel star and pop singer Miley Cyrus will have tongues wagging when she brings her Bangerz Tour to town 7:30 p.m. Aug. 2 at Wells Fargo Center, 3601 S. Broad St. For more information or tickets, call 215-389-9543.
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<b>IN ROARING COLOR:</b> Pop superstar Katy Perry brings her Prismatic Tour to Philadelphia 7 p.m. Aug. 4 and 5 at Wells Fargo Center, 3601 S. Broad St. For more information or tickets, call 215-389-9543.
IN ROARING COLOR: Pop superstar Katy Perry brings her Prismatic Tour to Philadelphia 7 p.m. Aug. 4 and 5 at Wells Fargo Center, 3601 S. Broad St. For more information or tickets, call 215-389-9543.
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Fri. 08/01 Rockstar Energy Drink Festival Hard-rock bands Avenged Sevenfold, Korn, Asking Alexandria, Trivium and more perform 1 p.m. at Susquehanna Bank Center, 1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, N.J.; 856-365-1300. Hedda Lettuce Movie Classics’ Interactive “Mommie Dearest” The drag personality performs and hosts a screening of the film 8 p.m. at the Rrazz Room, in the Ramada New Hope, 6426 Lower York Road, New Hope; 888-596-1027. Keyshia Cole The R&B singer performs 8 p.m. at TLA, 334 South St.; 215-922-1011. Bearlesque A bear-themed burlesque show, 9 p.m.-2 a.m. at Tabu Lounge, 200 S. 12th St.; 215-964-9675. Sammy Hagar The rock singer performs 8 p.m. at Borgata Hotel, Casino & Spa Event Center, 1 Borgata Way, Atlantic City, N.J.; 609-317-1000. Shaun of the Dead The horror comedy is screened 9:45 p.m. at Colonial Theatre, 227 Bridge St., Phoenixville; 610-917-0223. Sat. 08/02 The Offspring, Pennywise and The Vandals The punk-rock band performs an all-ages show 6 p.m. at The Electric Factory, 421 N. Seventh St.; 800-745-3000. John Legend The R&B singer performs 7 p.m. at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts, West Fairmount Park, 5201 Parkside Ave.; 800-745-3000. Kiss and Def Leppard The rock bands perform 7 p.m. at Boardwalk Hall, 2301 Boardwalk, Atlantic City, N.J.; 609-348-7000. Miley Cyrus The pop singer performs 7:30 p.m. at Wells Fargo Center, 3601 S. Broad St.; 215-389-9543. Billy Joel The singer performs 8 p.m. at Citizens Bank Park, 1 Citizens Bank Way; 215-218-5100. Christine Andreas and Martin Silvestri at the Piano The cabaret musicians perform 8 p.m. at the Rrazz Room, in the Ramada New Hope, 6426 Lower York Road, New Hope; 888-596-1027. Lil’ Steph Presents Glitter Mania! The burlesque show runs 9 p.m.-midnight at Ruba-Club Studios, 416 Green St.; 215- 627-9831. Sun. 08/03 All Quiet on the Western Front The 1929 war film is screened 2 p.m. at Colonial Theatre, 227 Bridge St., Phoenixville; 610-917-0223. Reggae in the Park The premiere Philadelphia reggae festival, 2 p.m. at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts, West Fairmount Park, 5201 Parkside Ave.; 800-745-3000. Kiss and Def Leppard The rock bands perform 7 p.m. at Susquehanna Bank Center, 1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, N.J.; 856-365-1300. Mon. 08/04 Hedwig & The Angry Inch The gender-bending rock musical is screened 8 p.m. at the Trocadero Theatre, 1003 Arch St.; 215-922-6888. Lipstick Mondays A weekly drag show featuring a changing roster of queens takes the stage 9 p.m. at The Raven, 385 W. Bridge St., New Hope; 215-862-2081. Tue. 08/05 12th Annual Gay Community Night at the Phillies The annual night for LGBT fans, 7:05 p.m. at Citizens Bank Park, 1 Citizens Bank Way; 215-218-5100. Wed. 08/06 Philadelphia Gay Men’s Chorus Auditions Sign up at auditions@pgmc.org to audition for the chorus from 6-8 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Holy Communion, 2111 Sansom St.; 215-731-9230; www.pgmc.org. 4W5 Blues Jam Local musicians get down, 7 p.m. at World Cafe Live at the Queen, 500 N. Market St., Wilmington, Del.; 302-994-1400. Marc Peters of The Alarm The rock singer celebrates the 30th anniversary of “The Declaration,” performing the album in its entirety 8 p.m. at World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St.; 215-222-1400. Thu. 08/07 The Burlesque Show The naughty fun begins 9 p.m. at the Borgata Hotel, Casino & Spa Music Box, 1 Borgata Way, Atlantic City, N.J.; 609-317-1000. Bob and Barbara’s Drag Show The outrageousness begins 11 p.m. at Bob and Barbara’s, 1509 South St.; 215-545-4511. 08/08 The Mumbles The New Orleans jazz/funk/soul group performs 8 p.m. at World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St.; 215-222-1400. Passenger The U.K. folk-rock singer performs 8 p.m. at The Electric Factory, 421 N. Seventh St.; 800-745-3000. Opening Franc D’Ambrosio and Glory Crampton The cabaret performers serenade the audience Aug. 7-10 at the Rrazz Room, in the Ramada New Hope, 6426 Lower York Road, New Hope; 888-596-1027. GayFest! Quince Productions presents a festival of LGBT-themed plays and shows in various locations Aug. 5-23; www.quinceproductions.com. Katy Perry The pop singer performs 7 p.m. Aug. 4 and 5 at Wells Fargo Center, 3601 S. Broad St.; 215-389-9543. Lewis Black The comedian performs Aug. 1-2 at the Borgata Hotel, Casino & Spa Music Box, 1 Borgata Way, Atlantic City, N.J.; 609-317-1000. Continuing The Book of Mormon The Tony Award-wining musical comedy by the creator of “South Park” runs through Sept. 19 at Forrest Theatre, 1114 Walnut St.; 215-923-1515. In Dialogue: Wolfgang Tillmans Philadelphia Museum of Art presents an exhibition of images by the European photographer through Oct. 26, 26th Street and the Parkway; 215-763-8100. Jonathan Cohn Glass: Window Aquarium Installation Graver’s Lane Gallery presents an exhibition of one-of-a-kind hand-blown glass pieces of high quality and creative design through Aug. 18, 8405 Germantown Road; 215-247-1603. The Main Dish Philadelphia Museum of Art presents an exhibition exploring how modern and contemporary kitchenware reflects attributes of the model homemaker through Sept. 28, 26th Street and the Parkway; 215-763-8100. Making a Classic Modern: Frank Gehry’s Master Plan for the Philadelphia Museum of Art Philadelphia Museum of Art presents an exhibition about the comprehensive design for the renewal and expansion of the museum by the internationally celebrated architect through Sept. 1, 26th Street and the Parkway; 215-763-8100. Oblivious Muse Gallery presents an exhibition of paintings by Carolyn Cohen through Aug. 31, 52 N. Second St.; 215-627-5310. Patrick Kelly: Runway of Love Philadelphia Museum of Art presents an exhibition highlighting the works of the famed fashion designer through Nov. 30, 26th Street and the Parkway; 215-763-8100. That’s So Gay: Outing Early America The Library Company of Philadelphia presents the exhibition exploring gay culture through Oct. 17, 1314 Locust St.; 215-546-3181. Closing Artificial Light: Flash Photography in the 20th Century Philadelphia Museum of Art presents an exhibition of diverse examples of flash photography, which gained widespread use in the 1920s with the invention of the mass-produced flashbulb, through Aug. 3, 26th Street and the Parkway; 215-763-8100. Christopher Titus The comedian seen on “Titus” performs Aug. 2 at Helium Comedy Club, 2031 Sansom St.; 215-496-9001. Cooking with the Calamari Sisters Bristol Riverside Theatre presents the popular comedy show about life and food through Aug. 3, 120 Radcliffe St., Bristol; 215-785-0100. Picasso Prints: Myths, Minotaurs and Muses Philadelphia Museum of Art presents an exhibition of Pablo Picasso’s response to the world of classical antiquity in nearly 50 prints from four critical decades of his career through Aug. 3, 26th Street and the Parkway; 215-763-8100.
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Local performers to ‘Phreak’ out
by Larry Nichols
Jul 31, 2014 | 61 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
MOOR MOTHER GODDESS (CAMAE DEFSTAR)
MOOR MOTHER GODDESS (CAMAE DEFSTAR)
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<b>ICON EBONY FIERCE </b>
ICON EBONY FIERCE
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The Phreak N’ Queer Music and Arts Festival returns for another weekend of musicians and visual artists showcasing their talents at venues throughout Philadelphia. The fourth-annual event brings together a wide range of performers with the idea that visibility is necessary to create social change. The festival is the perfect fit for drag performer, spoken-word artist and rapper Icon Ebony Fierce, who has performed at the festival in previous years. “Phreak N’ Queer represents true performance art in the queer form and showcasing queer artists, performers and drag queens in all forms,” Ebony Fierce said. “We have a yoga event. We have a drag brunch. We have different bands from all over. It’s a nice variety of things going on throughout the weekend. It’s not specifically for drag or burlesque performers. It’s for all forms of expression. It’s different drag than the mainstream drag performances.” Fellow hip-hop and spoken-word artist Moor Mother Goddess, also known as Camae Defstar, also sang the praises of the festival as an opportunity for like-minded performers to come together. “I’m really all about community and one of the organizers who is a friend of mine reached out to me,” she said about joining the festival. “If they need me to perform, then I am there. I’m really into supporting community organizers. I like collective line-ups, anything that makes things comfortable. It’s great to perform with people you organize with and play music with in other projects. There are really important bands as far as the trans community out here in Philadelphia so I’ll do things like that.” Defstar’s prolific output of hip-hop will grace the stage at Phreak N’ Queer and attendees might get a preview of the EP she plans to release later this summer. “I wanted to just showcase that I can rap,” Defstar said about her upcoming EP. “Sometimes the hip-hop I do is too weird and experimental to see that I can actually do the classical form of hip-hop and keep things simple. So this is me showcasing that I can do that even though it’s an industrial hip-hop album.” This year’s Phreak N’ Queer Festival will also see the debut performance of “Brave,” a new musical collaboration between Andrew Marsh and Mark McCloughan, who both perform in two vastly different local groups. “This is the first project we’ve done together,” McCloughan said. “Andrew plays with a group of classical musicians [Murmuration Improv]; they do improvised chamber music. This project is more electronic. We use synthesizers and samples. As for me, I play in a band, Totally Super-Pregnant, and we do electronic-pop music. It’s a new experience for me working in a collaborative-songwriting structure.” Like the other performers involved in the festival, McCloughan said he and Marsh were attracted to the intent and the supportive environment. “I like the mission statement and it feels like a very positively charged environment,” he said. “It’s not competitive. It’s about supporting the artists involved in the community and coming together and sharing that.” Phreak N’ Queer Music and Arts Festival runs through Aug. 3 at various locations in Philadelphia. For more information and a detailed list of performers and events, visit phreaknqueerfestival.wordpress.com.
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Marcos Matos: A cut above the rest
by Suzi Nash
Jul 31, 2014 | 76 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
“I think that the most important thing a woman can have — next to talent, of course — is her hairdresser.” — Joan Crawford I’m trying to grow out my hair so I can donate it this fall. I stopped in to Rapunzel’s for a talk and trim with stylist extraordinaire Marcos Matos and we dished on life, love and longevity. PGN: So tell me about the marvelous Marcos Matos. That sounds like a boxer’s name. MM: [Laughs] I was born in Puerto Rico, but I came to Philly when I was about 10 years old. My mom wanted a better future for us than she thought we could have staying in Puerto Rico. We came from very poor circumstances plus she wanted us to speak two languages. I lived here until I was about 16 and then I moved back to Puerto Rico. [Laughs] I was a mama’s boy and I was so spoiled/protected by my mom that when I started to realize that I was gay, I moved back to Puerto Rico to escape her and figure things out. PGN: Who did you stay with? MM: My dad. I knew that he was, like, more open-minded than my mom. Six months before I decided to move back, I told my mom I was gay, and all she did was sob, “Why, why? What did I do wrong?” The usual. After that I was like, I need to leave. I need to go find myself. I got there and my dad was like, “What are you doing here?” I said, “I need to find myself!” He was like, “You’re 16. What’s there to find?” He lived upstairs in his house and there was a rental space downstairs, which was empty at the time I moved back. He said, “OK, this will be your home. You’re going to pay me rent and you’ll find yourself all right.” I was like, Holy crap! I knew I needed to finish high school and I needed to find a job. I found two, McDonald’s and Burger King. I worked at McDonald’s from 6 a.m.-noon, then from 1-6 p.m. I worked at Burger King and at 6:30 I went to night school. It was an accelerated program so you could finish two-three years in one year. I worked like a slave. Cramming all that schoolwork in really made me appreciate education and I decided I wanted to be a teacher. I just love kids and I wanted to be a first-grade or kindergarten teacher, so I began to attend college in Puerto Rico. PGN: How did you go from that to becoming a hairdresser? MM: Well, I was so exhausted from working and going to school that I quit my job at Burger King. I was telling a friend that I needed a new job and she told me that the guy who lived upstairs from her was a hairdresser and was looking for an assistant. I didn’t know anything about it but my mom had been a hairdresser for a short period of time and I figured I knew at least a little. I went upstairs, met the owner, who was about 30 and of course I fell in love with him. He fell in love with me too and gave me the job. I told him that I was 19! We were dating and I was working for him and one day I asked him if I could do a haircut. He of course said, “No, you have to go to school for that.” I kept bugging him until he finally let me try and it came out really good. He asked me how I learned to cut hair and I said “From watching you all this time.” He wanted to send me to beauty school and I said, “Hell no! Then everyone will know I’m gay.” [Laughs] That was my big worry! He offered to pay for it and eventually talked me into going to beauty school. I did and became a hairdresser. One of my first jobs was doing hair for a soap opera called “Three Destinies (Tres Destinos).” It was a great experience — really, really cool. I dated him for about six years until I caught him cheating on me and I decided to come back to Philly. That was in 1995. PGN: Wow. So let’s backtrack a bit ... Tell me more about your family. MM: I have an older sister who moved to the states right about the time I was going back to Puerto Rico, and an older brother who is gay too. PGN: Who came out first? MM: It’s funny. I did not know that my brother was gay and vice-versa. We both had suspicions about each other but never spoke about it. It wasn’t until I started working as a hairdresser and dating that guy that he finally said, “Aha! I always thought you were gay!” I said, “Then why didn’t you say something?” We were never really very close. I used to follow him around and he would throw rocks at me and told me to go away. Looking back, I guess it was because he was gay and didn’t want me tagging so close behind in case I found out. My older sister was always the nurturing one; she was like a mother figure. PGN: You mentioned that your mother came here for a better life. What were some of the things she was trying to get away from? MM: The bad neighborhood and bad influence of other kids, drugs, poverty. She didn’t realize that stuff was here too. She was really strict, though, and it was to her favor that we didn’t speak English. It allowed her to make us a little bit afraid of the streets. We literally moved every year because she was always looking for a better neighborhood. Because she didn’t know the areas, it was hit and miss. I remember one time we moved to Fifth and Cambria and it was like, “Oh, no, this is not going to work.” We were only there for a few months. PGN: That makes me think of all the kids trying to cross the border right now to get a better life. Of course Puerto Rico is already part of the states, but it’s the idea that being in the continental United States would offer a better life. MM: Yes, it’s not always great here but it’s certainly way better than what they had. It’s amazing the way people are getting worked up. I mean, we’re all immigrants. We all came from other countries. But now that they’re here, folks are saying, “Oh no! Keep them out!” It would’ve been nice if the Indians said the same thing to them when they were trying to come to this country. And these people aren’t saying, “We’ll all go and overpopulate the country,” they’re just trying to save their kids. It’s everybody’s dream to come here and do better for their children, just like my mother did. PGN: I keep thinking if we stopped putting money into all these ridiculous wars we could feed and house all those children and perhaps make a priority of educating our own. Your mother sounds like a special lady. MM: Yes, she just passed away about three years ago. She died of an aneurysm; she actually had three of them, it was bad. But she was a survivor. She didn’t even want to go to the hospital with the first one, she just thought it was a bad headache. But it turned out her head had been bleeding internally for a week. The doctors at Hahnemann Hospital were our saviors. We probably would have lost her that first time if it hadn’t been for them. We were able to have her for another five years. But she was only 58 when she died. I have a little shrine for her in my house. PGN: How did you end up at Rapunzel’s, the salon where you are now? MM: Well, when I came back to Philly in ’95, escaping — here I go again running, this time from my ex-boyfriend — I thought I was just going to be here part-time. I wanted to give him time to get over me. I kept extending my stay here so I decided to get a job. I went to a lot of different salons in Philadelphia but no one would hire me because I didn’t have a license in Pennsylvania. So I went to the good old Chop Shop on South Street: They hired me and never asked about a license so I never told. I became the manager after two years and stayed on for another eight. PGN: As manager, did you write yourself up for not having a license? MM: [Laughs] No! Shortly after working there I did go and get that stupid license. Before that if the state inspectors ever came in, I would run out the back door leaving my client in the chair! It’s like a $500 fine or something if you get caught. After 10 years, I bought a building at Second and Bainbridge and was planning to open my own salon in 2007. That was just as the economy was tanking and all my budget plans went down the drain. Maggie Phun was one of my coworkers at Chop Shop and had already opened her own salon. She invited me to work with her so I sold my building and I’ve been here at Rapunzel’s beauty salon for nine years. PGN: What’s the craziest request you’ve heard? MM: I had a woman who wanted me to dye her vagina purple. PGN: I’m assuming you mean pubic hairs? MM: Yes, yes. She started to pick up her skirt to show me what she wanted me to do and I yelled, “Stop!” That was not in my repertoire. PGN: What services do you do? Will you do a bikini wax? MM: We offer quite a lot: color, cut and style of course, make-up and bridal services, retexturing and waxing — bikini and anal. The only thing I personally don’t like to do is manicures and pedicures. PGN: [Laughs] Wait, you’ll do anal waxing but not a mani-pedi? MM: The waxing is quick, just one, two, three, rip! The manicures are too much intense work. I don’t have the patience for it. PGN: Any hobbies outside of the salon? MM: I love to people watch. I’m always wondering what’s going on inside someone’s mind. What happened to them today, or this year? That’s why I don’t judge people, because you never know what might be going on in someone’s life. PGN: Tell me about your partner, Gatto. MM: I met him six months after I came back to Philly. It was Latin night at the 2/4 Club. Remember that? I was wearing a kilt, which was popular in Puerto Rico but hadn’t quite hit the states yet. He’s from Ecuador and I know he was wondering what was going on with me. But we danced that first night, then had our first date the next day. We went to two movies, then Woody’s and then stayed up all night talking. At about 6 a.m. he said, “If you’re tired, you can stay over.” I told him as long as there was no funny business because we’d just met and he said, “No, of course not.” Two weeks later we moved in together and 18 years later we’re still together. The next step is to adopt a kid. PGN: That’s amazing. Changing topics, is there a lot of color consciousness in the Latino community like there is in the states and in the African-American community? MM: Not really, most Puerto Ricans are a combination of Spanish, Indian and African descent. One thing about Puerto Ricans, when it comes to color there’s not a distinction between lighter and darker Puerto Ricans. Before I came to the states I didn’t know what racism was. If you’re walking down a dark street and a black person is coming towards you there’s no, “Oh my God, I better cross the street!” reaction like there is here. It’s just another person. Here, especially in the media, it’s always, “Black man kills someone, Latino man robs a store.” And they never distinguish who that Latino is, he could be Columbian or Venezuelan or Spanish, yet most people will just assume they mean Puerto Rican or Mexican. PGN: Unless you’re speaking, I would think many people would assume you’re black. Have you faced racism because of it? MM: All the time. People always think I’m black. It’s fine with me. I wish everybody would think like they do in Spain, though — it’s not about your color it’s about your actions. Are you kind, are you good or are you rude and obnoxious? That’s all that matters. PGN: Who’s the funniest person you know? MM: Nobody beats Noel Zayas. And the funniest part is that he’s not usually trying to be funny. PGN: Very true! And he’s got an infectious laugh! What’s a song that always makes you happy when you hear it? MM: I’m such a romantic I love really sad songs. There are a few Latin artists I listen to that you don’t even need to know Spanish to understand what they’re saying. They are so depressing and I love it! There’s another song ... who’s that black singer from the ’90s? She’s a woman and she sings ... Ooh, what’s that song? “I drive so fast ...” PGN: Tracy Chapman’s “Fast Car”? MM: Yes! That’s it. That song is sad, but it makes me happy! PGN: If you could have any elective surgery done with no risk, what would you do? MM: Electric surgery? PGN: [Laughs] No, that would be shock therapy. Elective! As in cosmetic ... MM: Ha! I already did it. I used to have very sleepy, droopy eyes to the point that I had trouble seeing. I hated it because people always thought that I was high or drunk. It really bothered me. So I had three eyelid procedures to correct it. PGN: You do a lot of hair for wedding parties. Any bridezillas? MM: Plenty! I’m not the kind of guy who will lie to you and tell you you look good when you don’t. I had one client who wanted me to put her hair up in this hideous hairstyle on the center of her head and top it off with a crown. She was kind of round to start with and it didn’t look good on her. I said, “I want you to have what you want, but I won’t be able to do it.” She was shocked but I’ve worked very hard to put my name where it is and at the end of the day, when someone looks at her pictures and says, “Who did your hair?” I don’t want them mentioning me. Because it won’t be followed with, “But that’s what the bride wanted.” They’ll just associate my name with that terrible hairdo. PGN: So, Romeo, what was your most romantic gesture? MM: I took Gatto to the Cayman Islands and when we were enjoying drinks on our deck as the sun was setting, I got down on one knee and gave him a ring. It wasn’t exactly a marriage proposal but I asked him if he would like to be with me forever and he said yes. For more information, visit www.rapunzelsbeautysalon.com. To suggest a community member for Family Portrait, email portraits05@aol.com.
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