street talk
Would you be more likely to purchase a product that’s packaged as LGBT-friendly?
Jul 31, 2014 | 15 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Eric Barnes</b><br />
truck driver<br />
Quinton, N.J.<br />
“No, it’s all about the product, not whether it has LGBT-friendly packaging. If it’s a hamburger I’m thinking about buying, I just care if it will taste good in my mouth. Whether or not it has LGBT-friendly packaging wouldn’t be the deciding factor.”
Eric Barnes
truck driver
Quinton, N.J.
“No, it’s all about the product, not whether it has LGBT-friendly packaging. If it’s a hamburger I’m thinking about buying, I just care if it will taste good in my mouth. Whether or not it has LGBT-friendly packaging wouldn’t be the deciding factor.”
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<b>Ashley Carrega</b><br />
sculptor<br />
Ross Township, Pa.<br />
“If it’s just a marketing ploy, that would be immoral and a turn-off for me. I’d want to know that the company is good, not only on LGBT issues, but all human-rights issues. I’d look into the subject, especially if I were investing large sums of money in the company.”
Ashley Carrega
sculptor
Ross Township, Pa.
“If it’s just a marketing ploy, that would be immoral and a turn-off for me. I’d want to know that the company is good, not only on LGBT issues, but all human-rights issues. I’d look into the subject, especially if I were investing large sums of money in the company.”
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<b>Devin Christopher</b><br />
grad student<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“Yes. I would be drawn to LGBT-friendly packaging. If the company is liberal enough to do something like that, that’s good enough for me. The company is taking a risk. I would support them for taking the risk.”
Devin Christopher
grad student
Washington Square West
“Yes. I would be drawn to LGBT-friendly packaging. If the company is liberal enough to do something like that, that’s good enough for me. The company is taking a risk. I would support them for taking the risk.”
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<b>Gabrielle Duncan</b><br />
retail buyer<br />
West Philadelphia<br />
“Yes. I like my money going to a company that operates ethically and has politics that I agree with. So chances are, I’d buy a product that has a rainbow wrapper, a rainbow flag or any symbolism that embodies LGBT rights.”
Gabrielle Duncan
retail buyer
West Philadelphia
“Yes. I like my money going to a company that operates ethically and has politics that I agree with. So chances are, I’d buy a product that has a rainbow wrapper, a rainbow flag or any symbolism that embodies LGBT rights.”
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Should our country celebrate Equality Day?
Jul 24, 2014 | 439 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Paige Harris</b><br />
student<br />
Havertown<br />
“Yes. I love the holidays. You get a chance to be with family. But Equality Day should be for everyone, not just the LGBT community. Everyone should be treated equal. August would be a good month for [Equality Day.] There’s no other holiday in that month.”
Paige Harris
student
Havertown
“Yes. I love the holidays. You get a chance to be with family. But Equality Day should be for everyone, not just the LGBT community. Everyone should be treated equal. August would be a good month for [Equality Day.] There’s no other holiday in that month.”
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<b>Liam Kelly</b><br />
student<br />
Upper Darby<br />
“Yes. There can never been too many holidays. It should be combined with Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Rename that holiday Equality Day, to show that we’re all equal. I like the sound of Equality Day.”
Liam Kelly
student
Upper Darby
“Yes. There can never been too many holidays. It should be combined with Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Rename that holiday Equality Day, to show that we’re all equal. I like the sound of Equality Day.”
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<b>James Kirkland</b><br />
program coordinator<br />
South Philadelphia<br />
"Yes. There’s a lot of history and struggle to honor and remember. I think having Equality Day in this country would be very fitting. There should always be more holidays, especially if you get off of work!”
James Kirkland
program coordinator
South Philadelphia
"Yes. There’s a lot of history and struggle to honor and remember. I think having Equality Day in this country would be very fitting. There should always be more holidays, especially if you get off of work!”
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<b>Star Stoltz</b><br />
hair stylist<br />
North Philadelphia<br />
“Yes, it would be good to have that. It’s been a neglected area for so long. There are holidays for everything else under the sun in this country, why not Equality Day? I have family members who are LGBT. I support LGBT rights.”
Star Stoltz
hair stylist
North Philadelphia
“Yes, it would be good to have that. It’s been a neglected area for so long. There are holidays for everything else under the sun in this country, why not Equality Day? I have family members who are LGBT. I support LGBT rights.”
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How do you keep cool in a heat wave?
Jul 17, 2014 | 545 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Ryne Abraham</b><br />
flight attendant<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“I’m very light-complected so sunblock is essential. I also try to stay in the shade whenever possible. Between 1-3 p.m., I stay indoors. I don’t have air [conditioning] at my place but I use a fan to cool off.Clothing is usually shorts and a tank top.”
Ryne Abraham
flight attendant
Washington Square West
“I’m very light-complected so sunblock is essential. I also try to stay in the shade whenever possible. Between 1-3 p.m., I stay indoors. I don’t have air [conditioning] at my place but I use a fan to cool off.Clothing is usually shorts and a tank top.”
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<b>Karen Feit</b><br />
social worker<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“Drink lots of fluids. But not coffee; it’s dehydrating. Sunglasses are a must. I also wear a skirt in hot weather, rather than pants. Skirts or dresses let more air circulate.”
Karen Feit
social worker
Washington Square West
“Drink lots of fluids. But not coffee; it’s dehydrating. Sunglasses are a must. I also wear a skirt in hot weather, rather than pants. Skirts or dresses let more air circulate.”
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<b>Rose Goddard</b><br />
artist<br />
South Philadelphia<br />
“White cotton T-shirts are great. They reflect the sun rather than absorb it. It’s also helpful to wear clothes that fit properly, not too tight or too baggy. You don’t want to be rearranging your clothes. That just makes you more aware of your sweat. And never wear polyester: That holds your sweat in.”
Rose Goddard
artist
South Philadelphia
“White cotton T-shirts are great. They reflect the sun rather than absorb it. It’s also helpful to wear clothes that fit properly, not too tight or too baggy. You don’t want to be rearranging your clothes. That just makes you more aware of your sweat. And never wear polyester: That holds your sweat in.”
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<b>Carmen Williams</b><br />
student<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“Don’t wear make-up or false eyelashes during the day. It just makes you feel hotter, and your skin gets oilier. Save the make-up for the evening. I tend to wear crop tops and flip flops on hot summer days.”
Carmen Williams
student
Washington Square West
“Don’t wear make-up or false eyelashes during the day. It just makes you feel hotter, and your skin gets oilier. Save the make-up for the evening. I tend to wear crop tops and flip flops on hot summer days.”
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Is a National Gay Blood Drive effective?
Jul 10, 2014 | 527 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Alex Bois</b><br />
baker<br />
Queen Village<br />
“Yes. It’s unfair to discriminate against people based on antiquated views. Gay and bisexual men should be allowed to donate blood. If their blood is proven to be clean, they should be accepted just like anyone else. If the National Gay Blood Drive can help make that happen, all the better.”
Alex Bois
baker
Queen Village
“Yes. It’s unfair to discriminate against people based on antiquated views. Gay and bisexual men should be allowed to donate blood. If their blood is proven to be clean, they should be accepted just like anyone else. If the National Gay Blood Drive can help make that happen, all the better.”
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<b>Dillon Parish</b><br />
student<br />
Orlando, Fla.<br />
“Yes. The blood drive has my wholehearted support. If nothing else, it shows that gay and bisexual men are civic-minded. They want to contribute to society. The ban is archaic. Unless I see sufficient peer-reviewed evidence to the contrary, I’ll maintain my position.”
Dillon Parish
student
Orlando, Fla.
“Yes. The blood drive has my wholehearted support. If nothing else, it shows that gay and bisexual men are civic-minded. They want to contribute to society. The ban is archaic. Unless I see sufficient peer-reviewed evidence to the contrary, I’ll maintain my position.”
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<b>Jamie Funk</b><br />
student<br />
Wallingford<br />
“Yes, because it will raise awareness about the bad FDA policy. But it shouldn’t become a viable, alternate way for the Red Cross to get blood. It should be a temporary measure, to get the FDA to change its policy.”
Jamie Funk
student
Wallingford
“Yes, because it will raise awareness about the bad FDA policy. But it shouldn’t become a viable, alternate way for the Red Cross to get blood. It should be a temporary measure, to get the FDA to change its policy.”
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<b>Jacob Somogye</b><br />
student<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“I think it’s a great idea. It could at least raise conscious-ness to a ridiculous policy. I don’t think it will change the FDA’s mind, but it’s a step in the right direction. I applaud the organizers.”
Jacob Somogye
student
Washington Square West
“I think it’s a great idea. It could at least raise conscious-ness to a ridiculous policy. I don’t think it will change the FDA’s mind, but it’s a step in the right direction. I applaud the organizers.”
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In how many states is it legal to fire someone on the basis of sexual orientation and/or gender identity?


(Answer is 32 for gender identity and 29 for sexual orientation.)
Jul 03, 2014 | 500 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Lauren Herman</b><br />
editor<br />
Northern Liberties<br />
“Thirty-two [states]. The Michael Sam thing piqued my interest so I looked into the subject and was surprised to see there’s much more prejudice than I thought. The extent of discrimination in this country is disgusting. A person’s LGBT status should be a non-issue in the workplace.”
Lauren Herman
editor
Northern Liberties
“Thirty-two [states]. The Michael Sam thing piqued my interest so I looked into the subject and was surprised to see there’s much more prejudice than I thought. The extent of discrimination in this country is disgusting. A person’s LGBT status should be a non-issue in the workplace.”
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<b>Rebecca Seelig</b><br />
student<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“I would say 10 different states. It’s getting better. I don’t think it’s that horrible. Things are getting a lot better. It’s definitely more acceptable to be open about your sexuality. So I’ll say 10 states.”
Rebecca Seelig
student
Washington Square West
“I would say 10 different states. It’s getting better. I don’t think it’s that horrible. Things are getting a lot better. It’s definitely more acceptable to be open about your sexuality. So I’ll say 10 states.”
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<b>Gavin Shaw</b><br />
accountant<br />
London, U.K.<br />
“Forty states. LGBT rights is a new kind of freedom that hasn’t spread everywhere in the U.S. People are generally quite welcoming but that attitude hasn’t been reflected in governmental policy quite yet. In the U.K., there are inclusive, comprehensive antibias laws that protect everyone. I think the United States would do well to follow the U.K.’s example.”
Gavin Shaw
accountant
London, U.K.
“Forty states. LGBT rights is a new kind of freedom that hasn’t spread everywhere in the U.S. People are generally quite welcoming but that attitude hasn’t been reflected in governmental policy quite yet. In the U.K., there are inclusive, comprehensive antibias laws that protect everyone. I think the United States would do well to follow the U.K.’s example.”
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<b>Montana Tomaszewski </b><br />
student<br />
South Philadelphia<br />
“Thirty states. There’s a lot of prejudice out there and a lot of ignorance about differences among people. It’s sad to say but our country has a long way to go before there’s true equality.”
Montana Tomaszewski
student
South Philadelphia
“Thirty states. There’s a lot of prejudice out there and a lot of ignorance about differences among people. It’s sad to say but our country has a long way to go before there’s true equality.”
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Should military recruiters be barred from LGBT events, since trans people can’t serve openly?
Jun 26, 2014 | 615 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Steven Dodge</b><br />
student<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“Yes, they should be barred. If you can’t support the community in full, you have no business at a community event. It’s really messed up how trans people are treated as subhuman. The military should stop dragging their feet and accept anyone ready to serve.”
Steven Dodge
student
Washington Square West
“Yes, they should be barred. If you can’t support the community in full, you have no business at a community event. It’s really messed up how trans people are treated as subhuman. The military should stop dragging their feet and accept anyone ready to serve.”
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<b>Latrice Mitchell</b><br />
student<br />
North Philadelphia<br />
“No. That’s being a little too harsh. It looks selfish on the part of the organizers. There will be a time when transgenders are welcome in the military. The community should be more patient. Understand that change takes time.”
Latrice Mitchell
student
North Philadelphia
“No. That’s being a little too harsh. It looks selfish on the part of the organizers. There will be a time when transgenders are welcome in the military. The community should be more patient. Understand that change takes time.”
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<b>Sarah Smith</b><br />
student<br />
Wilmington, Del.<br />
“Yes. I wouldn’t want to minimize the issues that trans people face on a regular basis. One form of discrimina-tion isn’t less egregious than another form. So I would support barring military recruiters until they accept transgender service members.”
Sarah Smith
student
Wilmington, Del.
“Yes. I wouldn’t want to minimize the issues that trans people face on a regular basis. One form of discrimina-tion isn’t less egregious than another form. So I would support barring military recruiters until they accept transgender service members.”
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<b>Kevin Williams</b><br />
student<br />
Newark, Del.<br />
“Yes. I don’t agree with the military’s anti-transgender policy. Military recruiters should be excluded from LGBT events until trans folks are welcome. I hope excluding the recruiters will apply enough pressure for the military to make the necessary changes.”
Kevin Williams
student
Newark, Del.
“Yes. I don’t agree with the military’s anti-transgender policy. Military recruiters should be excluded from LGBT events until trans folks are welcome. I hope excluding the recruiters will apply enough pressure for the military to make the necessary changes.”
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Should there be fines and criminal penalties for student bullying?
Jun 19, 2014 | 497 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Lizzie Charlton</b><br />
student<br />
Old City<br />
“I think you can begin with a suspension. The student might get the message after that. If it’s a repeat offender, there should be the option of fines and criminal penalties, but definitely not a fine or criminal penalty for a first-time offender. My preference is to educate kids from as young an age as possible, so they don’t think bullying is OK.”
Lizzie Charlton
student
Old City
“I think you can begin with a suspension. The student might get the message after that. If it’s a repeat offender, there should be the option of fines and criminal penalties, but definitely not a fine or criminal penalty for a first-time offender. My preference is to educate kids from as young an age as possible, so they don’t think bullying is OK.”
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<b>Tara Palmer</b><br />
social worker<br />
South Philadelphia<br />
“Start off with education. If it’s an LGBT issue, send the child to The Attic Youth Center for education. It’s all about education. If that doesn’t work, maybe juvenile detention for 15-30 days, and some community service. No fines. I don’t think fines hold people accountable. So they’re ineffective.”
Tara Palmer
social worker
South Philadelphia
“Start off with education. If it’s an LGBT issue, send the child to The Attic Youth Center for education. It’s all about education. If that doesn’t work, maybe juvenile detention for 15-30 days, and some community service. No fines. I don’t think fines hold people accountable. So they’re ineffective.”
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<b>Simone Chatham</b><br />
student<br />
Mount Airy<br />
“Yes, verbal bullying is as bad as physical bullying, and it can be just as damaging. It’s all very serious. I think there should be fines and criminal penalties for bullying. But not to the extreme. And if the child is under 18, their identity should be protected.”
Simone Chatham
student
Mount Airy
“Yes, verbal bullying is as bad as physical bullying, and it can be just as damaging. It’s all very serious. I think there should be fines and criminal penalties for bullying. But not to the extreme. And if the child is under 18, their identity should be protected.”
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<b>Rod Sewell</b><br />
retired engineer<br />
Northern Liberties<br />
“If the student does it once, they should be suspended. But if they keep doing it, their parents should get a fine. If the action is violent, there should be a criminal penalty for the student.”
Rod Sewell
retired engineer
Northern Liberties
“If the student does it once, they should be suspended. But if they keep doing it, their parents should get a fine. If the action is violent, there should be a criminal penalty for the student.”
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Is America ready for an open lesbian or gay president?
Jun 12, 2014 | 580 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Eliza Hastie</b><br />
server<br />
West Philadelphia<br />
“Yes. I think society doesn’t get the credit it deserves. People are more open-minded than we’re led to believe. The voices of hate tend to get amplified. But I have more faith in people. There’s a lot of support out there for the LGBT community.”
Eliza Hastie
server
West Philadelphia
“Yes. I think society doesn’t get the credit it deserves. People are more open-minded than we’re led to believe. The voices of hate tend to get amplified. But I have more faith in people. There’s a lot of support out there for the LGBT community.”
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<b>Krystal Narcise</b><br />
cashier<br />
South Philadelphia<br />
“Yes. There’s always time for change. We never thought there would be a black president, then Obama got elected. Things have gotten better. But a lesbian will probably get elected before a gay man. That’s because it’s more acceptable for two women to be together [rather] than two men.”
Krystal Narcise
cashier
South Philadelphia
“Yes. There’s always time for change. We never thought there would be a black president, then Obama got elected. Things have gotten better. But a lesbian will probably get elected before a gay man. That’s because it’s more acceptable for two women to be together [rather] than two men.”
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<b>Christina Overbagh</b><br />
business owner<br />
Queen Village<br />
“Definitely. The shock value [of being lesbian or gay] is gone. The stigma has greatly lessened. That’s my perception, living in Philadelphia. I can’t speak for Middle America. But for most of the country, I don’t think it would be an issue.”
Christina Overbagh
business owner
Queen Village
“Definitely. The shock value [of being lesbian or gay] is gone. The stigma has greatly lessened. That’s my perception, living in Philadelphia. I can’t speak for Middle America. But for most of the country, I don’t think it would be an issue.”
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<b>Dee Rafferty</b><br />
horticulturalist<br />
Port Richmond<br />
“Sadly, no. I’d give it 20 years. Too many people have a hard time with the subject. It’s silly that people still link sexual orientation with job performance, but they do. They still think someone’s sexual orientation matters. It’s just ignorance.”
Dee Rafferty
horticulturalist
Port Richmond
“Sadly, no. I’d give it 20 years. Too many people have a hard time with the subject. It’s silly that people still link sexual orientation with job performance, but they do. They still think someone’s sexual orientation matters. It’s just ignorance.”
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Were you surprised that Gov. Corbett didn’t appeal the marriage-equality ruling?
Jun 05, 2014 | 555 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Ashish Ahlawat</b><br />
hairstylist<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“Yes, because he’s known to be anti-LGBT. But he’s obviously doing it for the votes. He thinks he’ll gain more votes than he’ll lose by not appealing. It was purely a political decision.”
Ashish Ahlawat
hairstylist
Washington Square West
“Yes, because he’s known to be anti-LGBT. But he’s obviously doing it for the votes. He thinks he’ll gain more votes than he’ll lose by not appealing. It was purely a political decision.”
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<b>Brittany Koch</b><br />
membership coordinator<br />
Pennsport<br />
“Yes. I thought that he was going to fight it. He’s not a people person. Maybe he’s trying to soften his image. I suppose he wants to appease people, now that he’s up for re-election.”
Brittany Koch
membership coordinator
Pennsport
“Yes. I thought that he was going to fight it. He’s not a people person. Maybe he’s trying to soften his image. I suppose he wants to appease people, now that he’s up for re-election.”
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<b>Tracy Neal</b><br />
student<br />
Southwest Philadelphia<br />
“No. Corbett is looking at it from a business perspective. He knows that gay marriages will bring revenue into the state. Most of the states don’t allow gay marriages, so people will come here to get married. They’ll spend money here. Corbett realizes this. Money can be very persuasive.”
Tracy Neal
student
Southwest Philadelphia
“No. Corbett is looking at it from a business perspective. He knows that gay marriages will bring revenue into the state. Most of the states don’t allow gay marriages, so people will come here to get married. They’ll spend money here. Corbett realizes this. Money can be very persuasive.”
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<b>Anne Payne</b><br />
hairstylist<br />
Fishtown<br />
“Nothing surprises me about Corbett. He goes with the wind. He doesn’t seem to have any deeply held convictions. He just wants people to like him, so he can get votes and remain in office.”
Anne Payne
hairstylist
Fishtown
“Nothing surprises me about Corbett. He goes with the wind. He doesn’t seem to have any deeply held convictions. He just wants people to like him, so he can get votes and remain in office.”
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Do you believe someone who says “I love homosexuals” but opposes marriage equality?
May 29, 2014 | 670 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Jens Burnte</b><br />
salon manager<br />
Manayunk<br />
“No. It’s a cop-out. You can’t have your cake and eat it too. You can’t have it both ways. The person should admit they have hatred in their hearts. If you really love gays, you want them to have the same rights that you have.”
Jens Burnte
salon manager
Manayunk
“No. It’s a cop-out. You can’t have your cake and eat it too. You can’t have it both ways. The person should admit they have hatred in their hearts. If you really love gays, you want them to have the same rights that you have.”
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<b>Andrew Duggins</b><br />
Army officer<br />
Collingswood, N.J.<br />
“It’s difficult to understand how someone could make that statement. If you love someone, you want them to have all the opportunities in the world. I do believe that marriage is a fundamental right. Maybe the person is just coming from a place of ignorance, not hatred.”
Andrew Duggins
Army officer
Collingswood, N.J.
“It’s difficult to understand how someone could make that statement. If you love someone, you want them to have all the opportunities in the world. I do believe that marriage is a fundamental right. Maybe the person is just coming from a place of ignorance, not hatred.”
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<b>Kali Duggins</b><br />
consultant<br />
Collingswood, N.J.<br />
“No. The two parts of that statement are contradictory. It’s an oxymoron. My whole life, I’ve heard people say, ‘I love the sinner but hate the sin.’ I don’t buy it. It doesn’t hold any water.”
Kali Duggins
consultant
Collingswood, N.J.
“No. The two parts of that statement are contradictory. It’s an oxymoron. My whole life, I’ve heard people say, ‘I love the sinner but hate the sin.’ I don’t buy it. It doesn’t hold any water.”
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<b>Rashonda Harmon</b><br />
student<br />
Camden, N.J.<br />
“No. That sounds like double-talk. The person sounds phony. I wouldn’t believe something like that. If you love gays, then you should be for whatever they decide to do — as long as they don’t hurt anyone.”
Rashonda Harmon
student
Camden, N.J.
“No. That sounds like double-talk. The person sounds phony. I wouldn’t believe something like that. If you love gays, then you should be for whatever they decide to do — as long as they don’t hurt anyone.”
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