street talk
Will we have marriage equality nationwide by next summer?
Aug 21, 2014 | 105 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Christopher Anderson</b><br />
event planner<br />
South Philadelphia<br />
“Yes, I do think it’s possible. Enough people are making noise about it. I just think the Supreme Court will order it and be done with it. The people who want [marriage-equality] are very committed to the cause, especially if it affects them personally.”
Christopher Anderson
event planner
South Philadelphia
“Yes, I do think it’s possible. Enough people are making noise about it. I just think the Supreme Court will order it and be done with it. The people who want [marriage-equality] are very committed to the cause, especially if it affects them personally.”
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<b>Ada Arroyo</b><br />
merchandiser<br />
Pennsport<br />
“I don’t want to be a naysayer. But you can’t underest-imate hate. There’s still too many people in power who are against it. I’ll be optimistic and say we’ll it by the summer of 2017. If it isn’t done by then, there should be riots in the streets.”
Ada Arroyo
merchandiser
Pennsport
“I don’t want to be a naysayer. But you can’t underest-imate hate. There’s still too many people in power who are against it. I’ll be optimistic and say we’ll it by the summer of 2017. If it isn’t done by then, there should be riots in the streets.”
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<b>Anna Stephens</b><br />
server<br />
Chinatown<br />
“No. That’s a little too ambitious. The media has us thinking it’s just around the corner. But I don’t think that’s true. It can’t be much longer, though. I’ll say we’ll have it within five years.”
Anna Stephens
server
Chinatown
“No. That’s a little too ambitious. The media has us thinking it’s just around the corner. But I don’t think that’s true. It can’t be much longer, though. I’ll say we’ll have it within five years.”
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<b>Matt Stephens</b><br />
server<br />
South Philadelphia<br />
“No. There are some stubborn states that will delay it from going national. I don’t think the Supreme Court would force them to do it by next summer. They’d be pissing off too many people. They’re not willing to do that. They’ll wait 10 years for the hard-core opponents to die out.”
Matt Stephens
server
South Philadelphia
“No. There are some stubborn states that will delay it from going national. I don’t think the Supreme Court would force them to do it by next summer. They’d be pissing off too many people. They’re not willing to do that. They’ll wait 10 years for the hard-core opponents to die out.”
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Was it OK for Joan Rivers to joke about Michelle Obama’s gender identity?
Aug 14, 2014 | 513 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Claudia Atkins</b><br />
sex therapist<br />
Lansdowne<br />
“No. That was a bad move on her part. This is a very sensitive issue. I would say it’s really callous to joke about that. Just because Michelle Obama has broad shoulders, that has no bearing whatsoever on her sexual orientation or gender identity.”
Claudia Atkins
sex therapist
Lansdowne
“No. That was a bad move on her part. This is a very sensitive issue. I would say it’s really callous to joke about that. Just because Michelle Obama has broad shoulders, that has no bearing whatsoever on her sexual orientation or gender identity.”
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<b>Joelle Crouse</b><br />
store manager<br />
South Philadelphia<br />
“No. When a comedian takes advantage of discrimi-nated-against groups, then it’s not OK. That’s my belief. If Joan Rivers were trans, that would be different. But it’s unacceptable for a non-trans person to make a crack like that. And it disenfranchises women in politics.”
Joelle Crouse
store manager
South Philadelphia
“No. When a comedian takes advantage of discrimi-nated-against groups, then it’s not OK. That’s my belief. If Joan Rivers were trans, that would be different. But it’s unacceptable for a non-trans person to make a crack like that. And it disenfranchises women in politics.”
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<b>William Dewberry</b><br />
civil engineer<br />
Queen Village<br />
“No. I’m not a member of the LGBT community but that joke offends me because it would hurt my LGBT friends. If I’m not offended by it, then I’m part of the problem, not part of the solution. It’s time to stop taking bullshit against transgenders and gays.”
William Dewberry
civil engineer
Queen Village
“No. I’m not a member of the LGBT community but that joke offends me because it would hurt my LGBT friends. If I’m not offended by it, then I’m part of the problem, not part of the solution. It’s time to stop taking bullshit against transgenders and gays.”
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<b>Anthony Wood</b><br />
civil engineer<br />
Queen Village<br />
“Yes. Her whole shtick is to be outrageous. People need to chill out and lighten up. I think she’s funny as all hell. It wasn’t mean-spirited. Joan’s a very liberal person. She’s very cool. She goes after everyone, including herself.  She’s an equal-opportunity offender.”
Anthony Wood
civil engineer
Queen Village
“Yes. Her whole shtick is to be outrageous. People need to chill out and lighten up. I think she’s funny as all hell. It wasn’t mean-spirited. Joan’s a very liberal person. She’s very cool. She goes after everyone, including herself. She’s an equal-opportunity offender.”
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What should be next on President Obama’s LGBT list?
Aug 07, 2014 | 430 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Lea Allen</b><br />
student<br />
Northeast Philadelphia<br />
“More support for LGBT youth centers. And bullying remains a big problem; it can be damaging and kill people. President Obama should do more to support anti-bullying campaigns. He should be out there, speaking loudly about the problem. Bullying is not OK.”
Lea Allen
student
Northeast Philadelphia
“More support for LGBT youth centers. And bullying remains a big problem; it can be damaging and kill people. President Obama should do more to support anti-bullying campaigns. He should be out there, speaking loudly about the problem. Bullying is not OK.”
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<b>Mae Larrimore</b><br />
bartender<br />
Queen Village<br />
“He needs to appoint an openly LGBT cabinet member. That would send a powerful message. He’s a minority president. He should show that he has empathy for the struggles of other minorities. [An openly LGBT cabinet member] would also show the country that the LGBT voice matters.”
Mae Larrimore
bartender
Queen Village
“He needs to appoint an openly LGBT cabinet member. That would send a powerful message. He’s a minority president. He should show that he has empathy for the struggles of other minorities. [An openly LGBT cabinet member] would also show the country that the LGBT voice matters.”
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<b>Elias Morris</b><br />
artist<br />
Swedesboro<br />
“Obama should speak out about anti-LGBT persecution in other countries and consider cutting aid or otherwise imposing sanctions on countries that persecute LGBT folks. It’s a human-rights issue. Our president should use his political muscle to push that along.”
Elias Morris
artist
Swedesboro
“Obama should speak out about anti-LGBT persecution in other countries and consider cutting aid or otherwise imposing sanctions on countries that persecute LGBT folks. It’s a human-rights issue. Our president should use his political muscle to push that along.”
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<b>Taliah Smith</b><br />
homemaker<br />
North Philadelphia<br />
“I’d like to see President Obama advocate for marriage equality in all of his speeches. I support marriage equality. It’s good for the country. It helps people express themselves. If they can’t do that, it just makes more problems for the country.”
Taliah Smith
homemaker
North Philadelphia
“I’d like to see President Obama advocate for marriage equality in all of his speeches. I support marriage equality. It’s good for the country. It helps people express themselves. If they can’t do that, it just makes more problems for the country.”
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Would you be more likely to purchase a product that’s packaged as LGBT-friendly?
Jul 31, 2014 | 476 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Eric Barnes</b><br />
truck driver<br />
Quinton, N.J.<br />
“No, it’s all about the product, not whether it has LGBT-friendly packaging. If it’s a hamburger I’m thinking about buying, I just care if it will taste good in my mouth. Whether or not it has LGBT-friendly packaging wouldn’t be the deciding factor.”
Eric Barnes
truck driver
Quinton, N.J.
“No, it’s all about the product, not whether it has LGBT-friendly packaging. If it’s a hamburger I’m thinking about buying, I just care if it will taste good in my mouth. Whether or not it has LGBT-friendly packaging wouldn’t be the deciding factor.”
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<b>Ashley Carrega</b><br />
sculptor<br />
Ross Township, Pa.<br />
“If it’s just a marketing ploy, that would be immoral and a turn-off for me. I’d want to know that the company is good, not only on LGBT issues, but all human-rights issues. I’d look into the subject, especially if I were investing large sums of money in the company.”
Ashley Carrega
sculptor
Ross Township, Pa.
“If it’s just a marketing ploy, that would be immoral and a turn-off for me. I’d want to know that the company is good, not only on LGBT issues, but all human-rights issues. I’d look into the subject, especially if I were investing large sums of money in the company.”
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<b>Devin Christopher</b><br />
grad student<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“Yes. I would be drawn to LGBT-friendly packaging. If the company is liberal enough to do something like that, that’s good enough for me. The company is taking a risk. I would support them for taking the risk.”
Devin Christopher
grad student
Washington Square West
“Yes. I would be drawn to LGBT-friendly packaging. If the company is liberal enough to do something like that, that’s good enough for me. The company is taking a risk. I would support them for taking the risk.”
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<b>Gabrielle Duncan</b><br />
retail buyer<br />
West Philadelphia<br />
“Yes. I like my money going to a company that operates ethically and has politics that I agree with. So chances are, I’d buy a product that has a rainbow wrapper, a rainbow flag or any symbolism that embodies LGBT rights.”
Gabrielle Duncan
retail buyer
West Philadelphia
“Yes. I like my money going to a company that operates ethically and has politics that I agree with. So chances are, I’d buy a product that has a rainbow wrapper, a rainbow flag or any symbolism that embodies LGBT rights.”
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Should our country celebrate Equality Day?
Jul 24, 2014 | 494 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Paige Harris</b><br />
student<br />
Havertown<br />
“Yes. I love the holidays. You get a chance to be with family. But Equality Day should be for everyone, not just the LGBT community. Everyone should be treated equal. August would be a good month for [Equality Day.] There’s no other holiday in that month.”
Paige Harris
student
Havertown
“Yes. I love the holidays. You get a chance to be with family. But Equality Day should be for everyone, not just the LGBT community. Everyone should be treated equal. August would be a good month for [Equality Day.] There’s no other holiday in that month.”
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<b>Liam Kelly</b><br />
student<br />
Upper Darby<br />
“Yes. There can never been too many holidays. It should be combined with Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Rename that holiday Equality Day, to show that we’re all equal. I like the sound of Equality Day.”
Liam Kelly
student
Upper Darby
“Yes. There can never been too many holidays. It should be combined with Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Rename that holiday Equality Day, to show that we’re all equal. I like the sound of Equality Day.”
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<b>James Kirkland</b><br />
program coordinator<br />
South Philadelphia<br />
"Yes. There’s a lot of history and struggle to honor and remember. I think having Equality Day in this country would be very fitting. There should always be more holidays, especially if you get off of work!”
James Kirkland
program coordinator
South Philadelphia
"Yes. There’s a lot of history and struggle to honor and remember. I think having Equality Day in this country would be very fitting. There should always be more holidays, especially if you get off of work!”
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<b>Star Stoltz</b><br />
hair stylist<br />
North Philadelphia<br />
“Yes, it would be good to have that. It’s been a neglected area for so long. There are holidays for everything else under the sun in this country, why not Equality Day? I have family members who are LGBT. I support LGBT rights.”
Star Stoltz
hair stylist
North Philadelphia
“Yes, it would be good to have that. It’s been a neglected area for so long. There are holidays for everything else under the sun in this country, why not Equality Day? I have family members who are LGBT. I support LGBT rights.”
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How do you keep cool in a heat wave?
Jul 17, 2014 | 579 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Ryne Abraham</b><br />
flight attendant<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“I’m very light-complected so sunblock is essential. I also try to stay in the shade whenever possible. Between 1-3 p.m., I stay indoors. I don’t have air [conditioning] at my place but I use a fan to cool off.Clothing is usually shorts and a tank top.”
Ryne Abraham
flight attendant
Washington Square West
“I’m very light-complected so sunblock is essential. I also try to stay in the shade whenever possible. Between 1-3 p.m., I stay indoors. I don’t have air [conditioning] at my place but I use a fan to cool off.Clothing is usually shorts and a tank top.”
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<b>Karen Feit</b><br />
social worker<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“Drink lots of fluids. But not coffee; it’s dehydrating. Sunglasses are a must. I also wear a skirt in hot weather, rather than pants. Skirts or dresses let more air circulate.”
Karen Feit
social worker
Washington Square West
“Drink lots of fluids. But not coffee; it’s dehydrating. Sunglasses are a must. I also wear a skirt in hot weather, rather than pants. Skirts or dresses let more air circulate.”
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<b>Rose Goddard</b><br />
artist<br />
South Philadelphia<br />
“White cotton T-shirts are great. They reflect the sun rather than absorb it. It’s also helpful to wear clothes that fit properly, not too tight or too baggy. You don’t want to be rearranging your clothes. That just makes you more aware of your sweat. And never wear polyester: That holds your sweat in.”
Rose Goddard
artist
South Philadelphia
“White cotton T-shirts are great. They reflect the sun rather than absorb it. It’s also helpful to wear clothes that fit properly, not too tight or too baggy. You don’t want to be rearranging your clothes. That just makes you more aware of your sweat. And never wear polyester: That holds your sweat in.”
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<b>Carmen Williams</b><br />
student<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“Don’t wear make-up or false eyelashes during the day. It just makes you feel hotter, and your skin gets oilier. Save the make-up for the evening. I tend to wear crop tops and flip flops on hot summer days.”
Carmen Williams
student
Washington Square West
“Don’t wear make-up or false eyelashes during the day. It just makes you feel hotter, and your skin gets oilier. Save the make-up for the evening. I tend to wear crop tops and flip flops on hot summer days.”
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Is a National Gay Blood Drive effective?
Jul 10, 2014 | 547 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Alex Bois</b><br />
baker<br />
Queen Village<br />
“Yes. It’s unfair to discriminate against people based on antiquated views. Gay and bisexual men should be allowed to donate blood. If their blood is proven to be clean, they should be accepted just like anyone else. If the National Gay Blood Drive can help make that happen, all the better.”
Alex Bois
baker
Queen Village
“Yes. It’s unfair to discriminate against people based on antiquated views. Gay and bisexual men should be allowed to donate blood. If their blood is proven to be clean, they should be accepted just like anyone else. If the National Gay Blood Drive can help make that happen, all the better.”
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<b>Dillon Parish</b><br />
student<br />
Orlando, Fla.<br />
“Yes. The blood drive has my wholehearted support. If nothing else, it shows that gay and bisexual men are civic-minded. They want to contribute to society. The ban is archaic. Unless I see sufficient peer-reviewed evidence to the contrary, I’ll maintain my position.”
Dillon Parish
student
Orlando, Fla.
“Yes. The blood drive has my wholehearted support. If nothing else, it shows that gay and bisexual men are civic-minded. They want to contribute to society. The ban is archaic. Unless I see sufficient peer-reviewed evidence to the contrary, I’ll maintain my position.”
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<b>Jamie Funk</b><br />
student<br />
Wallingford<br />
“Yes, because it will raise awareness about the bad FDA policy. But it shouldn’t become a viable, alternate way for the Red Cross to get blood. It should be a temporary measure, to get the FDA to change its policy.”
Jamie Funk
student
Wallingford
“Yes, because it will raise awareness about the bad FDA policy. But it shouldn’t become a viable, alternate way for the Red Cross to get blood. It should be a temporary measure, to get the FDA to change its policy.”
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<b>Jacob Somogye</b><br />
student<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“I think it’s a great idea. It could at least raise conscious-ness to a ridiculous policy. I don’t think it will change the FDA’s mind, but it’s a step in the right direction. I applaud the organizers.”
Jacob Somogye
student
Washington Square West
“I think it’s a great idea. It could at least raise conscious-ness to a ridiculous policy. I don’t think it will change the FDA’s mind, but it’s a step in the right direction. I applaud the organizers.”
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In how many states is it legal to fire someone on the basis of sexual orientation and/or gender identity?


(Answer is 32 for gender identity and 29 for sexual orientation.)
Jul 03, 2014 | 549 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Lauren Herman</b><br />
editor<br />
Northern Liberties<br />
“Thirty-two [states]. The Michael Sam thing piqued my interest so I looked into the subject and was surprised to see there’s much more prejudice than I thought. The extent of discrimination in this country is disgusting. A person’s LGBT status should be a non-issue in the workplace.”
Lauren Herman
editor
Northern Liberties
“Thirty-two [states]. The Michael Sam thing piqued my interest so I looked into the subject and was surprised to see there’s much more prejudice than I thought. The extent of discrimination in this country is disgusting. A person’s LGBT status should be a non-issue in the workplace.”
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<b>Rebecca Seelig</b><br />
student<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“I would say 10 different states. It’s getting better. I don’t think it’s that horrible. Things are getting a lot better. It’s definitely more acceptable to be open about your sexuality. So I’ll say 10 states.”
Rebecca Seelig
student
Washington Square West
“I would say 10 different states. It’s getting better. I don’t think it’s that horrible. Things are getting a lot better. It’s definitely more acceptable to be open about your sexuality. So I’ll say 10 states.”
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<b>Gavin Shaw</b><br />
accountant<br />
London, U.K.<br />
“Forty states. LGBT rights is a new kind of freedom that hasn’t spread everywhere in the U.S. People are generally quite welcoming but that attitude hasn’t been reflected in governmental policy quite yet. In the U.K., there are inclusive, comprehensive antibias laws that protect everyone. I think the United States would do well to follow the U.K.’s example.”
Gavin Shaw
accountant
London, U.K.
“Forty states. LGBT rights is a new kind of freedom that hasn’t spread everywhere in the U.S. People are generally quite welcoming but that attitude hasn’t been reflected in governmental policy quite yet. In the U.K., there are inclusive, comprehensive antibias laws that protect everyone. I think the United States would do well to follow the U.K.’s example.”
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<b>Montana Tomaszewski </b><br />
student<br />
South Philadelphia<br />
“Thirty states. There’s a lot of prejudice out there and a lot of ignorance about differences among people. It’s sad to say but our country has a long way to go before there’s true equality.”
Montana Tomaszewski
student
South Philadelphia
“Thirty states. There’s a lot of prejudice out there and a lot of ignorance about differences among people. It’s sad to say but our country has a long way to go before there’s true equality.”
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Should military recruiters be barred from LGBT events, since trans people can’t serve openly?
Jun 26, 2014 | 668 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Steven Dodge</b><br />
student<br />
Washington Square West<br />
“Yes, they should be barred. If you can’t support the community in full, you have no business at a community event. It’s really messed up how trans people are treated as subhuman. The military should stop dragging their feet and accept anyone ready to serve.”
Steven Dodge
student
Washington Square West
“Yes, they should be barred. If you can’t support the community in full, you have no business at a community event. It’s really messed up how trans people are treated as subhuman. The military should stop dragging their feet and accept anyone ready to serve.”
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<b>Latrice Mitchell</b><br />
student<br />
North Philadelphia<br />
“No. That’s being a little too harsh. It looks selfish on the part of the organizers. There will be a time when transgenders are welcome in the military. The community should be more patient. Understand that change takes time.”
Latrice Mitchell
student
North Philadelphia
“No. That’s being a little too harsh. It looks selfish on the part of the organizers. There will be a time when transgenders are welcome in the military. The community should be more patient. Understand that change takes time.”
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<b>Sarah Smith</b><br />
student<br />
Wilmington, Del.<br />
“Yes. I wouldn’t want to minimize the issues that trans people face on a regular basis. One form of discrimina-tion isn’t less egregious than another form. So I would support barring military recruiters until they accept transgender service members.”
Sarah Smith
student
Wilmington, Del.
“Yes. I wouldn’t want to minimize the issues that trans people face on a regular basis. One form of discrimina-tion isn’t less egregious than another form. So I would support barring military recruiters until they accept transgender service members.”
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<b>Kevin Williams</b><br />
student<br />
Newark, Del.<br />
“Yes. I don’t agree with the military’s anti-transgender policy. Military recruiters should be excluded from LGBT events until trans folks are welcome. I hope excluding the recruiters will apply enough pressure for the military to make the necessary changes.”
Kevin Williams
student
Newark, Del.
“Yes. I don’t agree with the military’s anti-transgender policy. Military recruiters should be excluded from LGBT events until trans folks are welcome. I hope excluding the recruiters will apply enough pressure for the military to make the necessary changes.”
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Should there be fines and criminal penalties for student bullying?
Jun 19, 2014 | 529 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<b>Lizzie Charlton</b><br />
student<br />
Old City<br />
“I think you can begin with a suspension. The student might get the message after that. If it’s a repeat offender, there should be the option of fines and criminal penalties, but definitely not a fine or criminal penalty for a first-time offender. My preference is to educate kids from as young an age as possible, so they don’t think bullying is OK.”
Lizzie Charlton
student
Old City
“I think you can begin with a suspension. The student might get the message after that. If it’s a repeat offender, there should be the option of fines and criminal penalties, but definitely not a fine or criminal penalty for a first-time offender. My preference is to educate kids from as young an age as possible, so they don’t think bullying is OK.”
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<b>Tara Palmer</b><br />
social worker<br />
South Philadelphia<br />
“Start off with education. If it’s an LGBT issue, send the child to The Attic Youth Center for education. It’s all about education. If that doesn’t work, maybe juvenile detention for 15-30 days, and some community service. No fines. I don’t think fines hold people accountable. So they’re ineffective.”
Tara Palmer
social worker
South Philadelphia
“Start off with education. If it’s an LGBT issue, send the child to The Attic Youth Center for education. It’s all about education. If that doesn’t work, maybe juvenile detention for 15-30 days, and some community service. No fines. I don’t think fines hold people accountable. So they’re ineffective.”
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<b>Simone Chatham</b><br />
student<br />
Mount Airy<br />
“Yes, verbal bullying is as bad as physical bullying, and it can be just as damaging. It’s all very serious. I think there should be fines and criminal penalties for bullying. But not to the extreme. And if the child is under 18, their identity should be protected.”
Simone Chatham
student
Mount Airy
“Yes, verbal bullying is as bad as physical bullying, and it can be just as damaging. It’s all very serious. I think there should be fines and criminal penalties for bullying. But not to the extreme. And if the child is under 18, their identity should be protected.”
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<b>Rod Sewell</b><br />
retired engineer<br />
Northern Liberties<br />
“If the student does it once, they should be suspended. But if they keep doing it, their parents should get a fine. If the action is violent, there should be a criminal penalty for the student.”
Rod Sewell
retired engineer
Northern Liberties
“If the student does it once, they should be suspended. But if they keep doing it, their parents should get a fine. If the action is violent, there should be a criminal penalty for the student.”
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