PGN Special Edition Coverage

In a time when President Donald Trump has directed a ban on transgender individuals from serving in the military, his administration has rescinded protections for trans students in public schools and the advancement of LGBTQ national historic landmarks are in question, the stories of those who fought for equal rights in an earlier era seem to be more important than ever before.

Many things have been said and written about “Stonewall,” the historic confrontation in June 1969 after a police raid at the Stonewall Inn, a Mafia-run gay bar on Christopher Street in New York City’s Greenwich Village that ignited the Gay Revolution — and an incredible change in attitudes and feelings about queer people throughout the world. 

With more than 75 active lawsuits involving the freedom to marry currently at the state and federal levels, exploring the state of marriage equality in the United States can quickly become a confusing, headache-inducing endeavor. Here are the answers to some questions you might have about what we can expect next in the marriage-equality movement.

The moment the federal court decision allowed same-sex marriage in Pennsylvania, Michael, my partner of 17 years, proposed. We had talked about eloping in Elkton, Md., in the past, but decided to be wed only when the state where we lived would recognize our marriage. As such, on May 20, 2014, we were engaged.

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